Former mayor's criminal trial to begin

Brady, 52, faces charges of official misconduct

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— The trial of a former Sparta mayor charged with official misconduct will begin Tuesday in New Jersey Superior Court.

Brian Brady, 52, is facing nine charges including official misconduct, pattern of official misconduct, theft by deception, tampering with public records or information and computer theft.

The charges stem from allegations Brady submitted fraudulent time sheets, filed fraudulent firearms qualification certificates, misused police databases and resources when he was employed as a police captain with the New Jersey Human Services Police.

According to the indictment, handed down in February 2012, from March 2007 to 2010, Brady filed time sheets which indicated that he was working, when evidence showed he was out of state for personal reasons or in Atlantic City. It is also believed that he used a state vehicle, gas card and E-Z pass on personal trips.

The indictment also alleges that Brady filed certain firearms certification forms which falsely stated that he completed requirements, which he had not. He is also alleged to have directed another employee to illegally use a police database to conduct background checks on members of a minor league baseball team, a health care worker and a vehicle.

Brady served as a Sparta councilman and mayor from 2004 to 2010. He was serving on the Sparta Planning Board at the time of the indictment and was asked to resign immediately. He was also suspended from his police position when the charges were handed down.

Deputy Attorney Generals Cynthia Vazquez and Victor Salgado are prosecuting the case, which is expected to take four to six weeks, according to the New Jersey Office of the Attorney General Division of Criminal Justice.

Brady is being represented by Haddonfield-based attorney Mario Iavicoli.

Brady was the third highest ranking official in the Human Services Police and reported only to the chief and director. His annual salary was $101,000, at the time of his indictment.

The Department is tasked with providing police services at developmental centers and psychiatric hospitals operated by the Department of Human Services.

“It is deeply troubling that a police supervisor, who has a sworn duty to uphold the law, is instead charged in this indictment with violating the public’s trust through multiple criminal acts of dishonesty and theft or abuse of police resources,” then-Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa said at the time of the indictment. “By aggressively prosecuting official misconduct, we will deliver a loud and clear message that nobody is above the law.”

Brady could face a mandatory minimum sentence of five years in prison without parole for each of the second degree crimes if found guilty, according to state law. Second-degree crimes carry a sentence of five to 1- years and a fine of up to $150,000.

The second-degree charges Brady faces are the three counts of official misconduct, one count of pattern of official misconduct, and one count of computer theft.

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